Cybersecurity & Privacy Predictions For 2018, Law360, ft. Tad Devlin & Marc Voses

Posted Jan 2, 2018

Tad A. Devlin and Marc S. Voses, partners with Kaufman Dolowich & Voluck, LLP, are both quoted in Law360’s article on cybersecurity and privacy issues for 2018 written by Allison Grande.

Law360, New York (January 1, 2018, 3:04 PM EST) — Some of the biggest privacy and cybersecurity buzzwords from the past year will only continue to grow in prominence in 2018, with attorneys predicting a further expansion of an already complex data breach landscape, greater attention being paid to internet-connected devices, and even more additions to an already vast global patchwork of laws. 

Here, cybersecurity and privacy attorneys identify some major trends and offer predictions for what practitioners should expect to hear from their clients in the coming year. 

Kaufman Dolowich & Voluck LLP partner Tad Devlin added that the newest lawsuits are notable in that they signal a larger trend of state regulators being more focused on enforcement and regulation in the privacy and data security sphere.

“We’re seeing regulators clamping down in terms of the data security measures that need to be put in place by companies, and we’re seeing more layers of regulations and divisions in enforcement,” Devlin said. 

And in the U.S., attorneys are expecting states to continue the trend of amending their breach notification laws to add more categories of personal information — including data collected from internet of things devices and geolocation information — that trigger notification, while the federal government continues to struggle with long-running efforts to set a uniform breach reporting standard.

“Companies are seeking to comply with different data breach standards, and the conflicts that arise can make compliance costly and burdensome,” said Kaufman Dolowich partner Marc Voses. “Companies are hoping for a standard that is more straightforward, and hopefully uniformity will soon emerge.”

“Cyber currency hacks are increasing, especially due to the nature of these assets that make it easy for cybercriminals to take the information and disappear,” Devlin said.  

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